Internalizing and externalizing symptoms in young children exposed to intimate partner violence: Examining intervening processes

Amie Langer Zarling*, Sarah Taber-Thomas, Amanda Murray, John F. Knuston, Erika Lawrence, Nizete Ly Valles, David S. DeGarmo, Lew Bank

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children's emotion dysregulation, children's appraisals, maternal psychological functioning, and harsh discipline were investigated as potential mediators in the putative link between exposure to intimate partner violence and poor child outcomes. Participants included 132 children ages 6-8 and their mothers who had been enrolled in a longitudinal study of parenting and children's social development. The mothers were receiving some form of government-based economic assistance or other social services, and were currently involved in a romantic relationship. Results of structural equation modeling indicated children's emotion dysregulation mediated the links between exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) and both internalizing and externalizing problems. Harsh discipline mediated the link between exposure to IPV and externalizing, but not internalizing, symptoms. Child appraisals and maternal psychological functioning mediated the link between exposure to IPV and internalizing, but not externalizing, symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)945-955
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Child adjustment
  • Children's exposure
  • IPV
  • Mediators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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