International comparison of death place for suicide; a population-level eight country death certificate study

Yong Joo Rhee*, Dirk Houttekier, Roderick MacLeod, Donna M. Wilson, Marylou Cardenas-Turanzas, Martin Loucka, Regis Aubry, Joan Teno, Sungwon Roh, Mark A. Reinecke, Luc Deliens, Joachim Cohen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The places of death for people who died of suicide were compared across eight countries and socio-demographic factors associated with home suicide deaths identified. Methods: Death certificate data were analyzed; using multivariable binary logistic regression to determine associations. Results: National suicide death rates ranged from 1.4 % (Mexico) to 6.4 % (South Korea). The proportion of suicide deaths occurring at home was high, ranging from 29.9 % (South Korea) to 65.8 % (Belgium). Being older, female, widowed/separated, highly educated and living in an urban area were risk factors for home suicide. Conclusions: Home suicide deaths need specific attention in prevention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-106
Number of pages6
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Death certificate data
  • International comparison
  • Location of death
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Rhee, Y. J., Houttekier, D., MacLeod, R., Wilson, D. M., Cardenas-Turanzas, M., Loucka, M., Aubry, R., Teno, J., Roh, S., Reinecke, M. A., Deliens, L., & Cohen, J. (2016). International comparison of death place for suicide; a population-level eight country death certificate study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 51(1), 101-106. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1148-5