International perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology: comparison across 14 countries around the world

Christopher L. Grote*, Julia I. Novitski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To review and summarize data provided by special issue authors regarding the education, training, and practice of neuropsychologists from 14 surveyed countries. Method: A table was constructed to present an overview of variables of interest. Results: There is considerable diversity among surveyed countries regarding the education and training required to enter practice as a clinical neuropsychologist. Clinical neuropsychologists are typically well compensated, at least in comparison to what constitutes an average salary in each country. Conclusions: Despite substantial variations in education and training pathways, and availability of neuropsychologists from country to country, two common areas for future development are suggested. First, identification, development, and measurement of core competencies for neuropsychological education and practice are needed that can serve as a unifying element for the world’s clinical neuropsychologists. Second, greater emphasis on recognizing and addressing the need for assessment and treatment of diverse populations is needed if the world’s citizens can hope to benefit from the expertise of practitioners in our field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1380-1388
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • competencies
  • diversity
  • education
  • International

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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