Internet-based preventive intervention for reducing eating disorder risk: A randomized controlled trial comparing guided with unguided self-help

Andrea E. Kass, Mickey Trockel, Debra L. Safer, Meghan M. Sinton, Darby Cunning, Marianne T. Rizk, Brooke H. Genkin, Hannah L. Weisman, Jakki O. Bailey, Corinna Jacobi, Denise E. Wilfley*, C. Barr Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Student Bodies, an internet-based intervention, has successfully reduced weight/shape concerns and prevented eating disorders in a subset of college-age women at highest risk for an eating disorder. Student Bodies includes an online, guided discussion group; however, the clinical utility of this component is unclear. This study investigated whether the guided discussion group improves program efficacy in reducing weight/shape concerns in women at high risk for an eating disorder. Exploratory analyses examined whether baseline variables predicted who benefitted most. Women with high weight/shape concerns (N=151) were randomized to Student Bodies with a guided discussion group (n=74) or no discussion group (n=77). Regression analyses showed weight/shape concerns were reduced significantly more among guided discussion group than no discussion group participants (p=0.002; d=0.52); guided discussion group participants had 67% lower odds of having high-risk weight/shape concerns post-intervention (p=0.02). There were no differences in binge eating at post-intervention between the two groups, and no moderators emerged as significant. Results suggest the guided discussion group improves the efficacy of Student Bodies in reducing weight/shape concerns in college students at high risk for an eating disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-98
Number of pages9
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Eating disorders
  • Guided self-help
  • Internet treatment
  • Prevention
  • Randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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