Internet Searches About Therapies Do Not Impact Willingness to Accept Prescribed Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

Alexandra Feathers, Tommy Yen, Laura Hekyung Yun, Garrett Strizich, Arun Swaminath*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A significant majority of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) search the Internet for information about their disease. While patients who search the Internet for disease or treatment information are believed to be more resistant to accepting medical therapy, no studies have tested this hypothesis. Methods: All IBD patients over a 3-month period across three gastroenterology practices were surveyed about their disease, treatments, websites visited, attitudes toward medications, and their willingness to accept prescribed therapies after disease-related Internet searches. Results: Of 142 total patients, 91 % of respondents searched the Internet for IBD information. The vast majority (82 %) reported taking medication upon their doctor’s recommendation and cited the desire to acquire additional information about their disease and prescribed therapies as their most important search motivator (77 %). Internet usage did not affect the willingness of 52 % of our cohort to accept prescribed medication. Conclusion: The majority of IBD patients who searched the Internet for disease and treatment-related information were not affected in their willingness to accept prescribed medical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1013-1020
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive diseases and sciences
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Internet
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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