Interstitial cystitis: Animal models

Tony Buffington*, Michael R. Ruggieri, David Klumpp

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 1990, although the etiology and pathogenesis of the condition then referred to as “interstitial cystitis” (IC) was admitted to be largely or even completely unknown, the widely held implicit working assumptions held that it is a bladder disease. These assumptions implied that if we could discover and correct what was wrong with the bladder itself then we could cure the condition. These assumptions have proved to be largely off base. At that time, the previous suggestions that IC might have a primarily autoimmune or infectious etiology were largely abandoned. The autoimmune hypothesis still remains but has yet to be either been proven nor disproven conclusively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBladder Pain Syndrome - An Evolution
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages33-36
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9783319614496
ISBN (Print)9783319614489
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Buffington, T., Ruggieri, M. R., & Klumpp, D. (2017). Interstitial cystitis: Animal models. In Bladder Pain Syndrome - An Evolution (pp. 33-36). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61449-6_6