Intestinal anastomotic ulcers in children with short bowel syndrome and anemia detected by capsule endoscopy

Lee M Bass*, Jessica Zimont, Joshua Daniel Prozialeck, Riccardo A Superina, Valeria C Cohran

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Anastomotic ulcers are a known cause of anemia in children with a history of intestinal resection. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy can be used to diagnose these ulcers; however, the area of involvement may be difficult to visualize with standard endoscopic techniques. Capsule endoscopy (CE) offers an alternative method for visualizing the small bowel in these patients. We describe a cohort of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and anemia who had anastomotic ulcers detected by CE. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients with SBS at our institution who underwent CE for chronic gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss. Results: Four patients who underwent a total of 6 CE procedures were identified. The underlying diagnoses included necrotizing enterocolitis (n=2), gastroschisis (n=1), and jejunal atresia (n=1). All of the patients had their ileocecal valves resected during previous surgeries and had received blood transfusions within the previous several months. The median age at the time of CE was 5.5 years (range 4-14 years). Enterocolonic anastomotic ulcers were noted in the studies as wide, flat circumferential lesions with a white base. The CE results guided a change in medical management in all of the 4 patients, including surgical revision of their anastomosis. Conclusions: CE may be a helpful adjunctive tool for detecting anastomotic ulcers in patients with SBS and chronic GI blood loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Short Bowel Syndrome
Capsule Endoscopy
Ulcer
Anemia
Intestinal Atresia
Ileocecal Valve
Gastroschisis
Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Colonoscopy
Reoperation
Blood Transfusion
Endoscopy

Keywords

  • Bleeding
  • Diagnosis
  • Gastrointestinal
  • Pediatric
  • Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Intestinal anastomotic ulcers in children with short bowel syndrome and anemia detected by capsule endoscopy",
abstract = "Objectives: Anastomotic ulcers are a known cause of anemia in children with a history of intestinal resection. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy can be used to diagnose these ulcers; however, the area of involvement may be difficult to visualize with standard endoscopic techniques. Capsule endoscopy (CE) offers an alternative method for visualizing the small bowel in these patients. We describe a cohort of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and anemia who had anastomotic ulcers detected by CE. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients with SBS at our institution who underwent CE for chronic gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss. Results: Four patients who underwent a total of 6 CE procedures were identified. The underlying diagnoses included necrotizing enterocolitis (n=2), gastroschisis (n=1), and jejunal atresia (n=1). All of the patients had their ileocecal valves resected during previous surgeries and had received blood transfusions within the previous several months. The median age at the time of CE was 5.5 years (range 4-14 years). Enterocolonic anastomotic ulcers were noted in the studies as wide, flat circumferential lesions with a white base. The CE results guided a change in medical management in all of the 4 patients, including surgical revision of their anastomosis. Conclusions: CE may be a helpful adjunctive tool for detecting anastomotic ulcers in patients with SBS and chronic GI blood loss.",
keywords = "Bleeding, Diagnosis, Gastrointestinal, Pediatric, Small bowel bacterial overgrowth",
author = "Bass, {Lee M} and Jessica Zimont and Prozialeck, {Joshua Daniel} and Superina, {Riccardo A} and Cohran, {Valeria C}",
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T1 - Intestinal anastomotic ulcers in children with short bowel syndrome and anemia detected by capsule endoscopy

AU - Bass, Lee M

AU - Zimont, Jessica

AU - Prozialeck, Joshua Daniel

AU - Superina, Riccardo A

AU - Cohran, Valeria C

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Objectives: Anastomotic ulcers are a known cause of anemia in children with a history of intestinal resection. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy can be used to diagnose these ulcers; however, the area of involvement may be difficult to visualize with standard endoscopic techniques. Capsule endoscopy (CE) offers an alternative method for visualizing the small bowel in these patients. We describe a cohort of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and anemia who had anastomotic ulcers detected by CE. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients with SBS at our institution who underwent CE for chronic gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss. Results: Four patients who underwent a total of 6 CE procedures were identified. The underlying diagnoses included necrotizing enterocolitis (n=2), gastroschisis (n=1), and jejunal atresia (n=1). All of the patients had their ileocecal valves resected during previous surgeries and had received blood transfusions within the previous several months. The median age at the time of CE was 5.5 years (range 4-14 years). Enterocolonic anastomotic ulcers were noted in the studies as wide, flat circumferential lesions with a white base. The CE results guided a change in medical management in all of the 4 patients, including surgical revision of their anastomosis. Conclusions: CE may be a helpful adjunctive tool for detecting anastomotic ulcers in patients with SBS and chronic GI blood loss.

AB - Objectives: Anastomotic ulcers are a known cause of anemia in children with a history of intestinal resection. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy can be used to diagnose these ulcers; however, the area of involvement may be difficult to visualize with standard endoscopic techniques. Capsule endoscopy (CE) offers an alternative method for visualizing the small bowel in these patients. We describe a cohort of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and anemia who had anastomotic ulcers detected by CE. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients with SBS at our institution who underwent CE for chronic gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss. Results: Four patients who underwent a total of 6 CE procedures were identified. The underlying diagnoses included necrotizing enterocolitis (n=2), gastroschisis (n=1), and jejunal atresia (n=1). All of the patients had their ileocecal valves resected during previous surgeries and had received blood transfusions within the previous several months. The median age at the time of CE was 5.5 years (range 4-14 years). Enterocolonic anastomotic ulcers were noted in the studies as wide, flat circumferential lesions with a white base. The CE results guided a change in medical management in all of the 4 patients, including surgical revision of their anastomosis. Conclusions: CE may be a helpful adjunctive tool for detecting anastomotic ulcers in patients with SBS and chronic GI blood loss.

KW - Bleeding

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KW - Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

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