Introduction: Toward a global historical sociology of race and racism

Katrina Quisumbing King, Alexandre I.R. White

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This volume of Political Power and Social Theory highlights ongoing conversations concerning sociological approaches to the global and historical study of race and racism. In this introduction, we discuss the challenges and promises of studying race across space and time. We emphasize that attending to race on the global scale not only improves our understanding of how race operates in current times, but also helps us better recognize how social relations of power are organized. We underscore how scholars ought to conceive of racism as central to the making of the so-called modern world. The eight papers in this volume advance this intellectual project. We consider them in conversation with one another to highlight four foundations for the global historical study of race and racism. First, the authors emphasize on-the-ground race-making. Second, they explore continuity, change, and overlapping racial orders. Third, the authors document the tensions between local dynamics and global relations, drawing attention to sites where the two meet. Fourth, the authors interrogate the relationship of modernity to the construction of race around the world. The articles in this volume are important examples of work that pushes the study of race and racism forward.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPolitical Power and Social Theory
PublisherEmerald Group Holdings Ltd.
Pages1-21
Number of pages21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Publication series

NamePolitical Power and Social Theory
Volume38
ISSN (Print)0198-8719

Keywords

  • Classification
  • Colonialism
  • Empire
  • Global
  • Historical
  • Modernity
  • Nation
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Racism
  • Social construction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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