Investigation of motor adaptation to movement versus object parameters

Felix Huang*, R. Brent Gillespie, Arthur D. Kuo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this study healthy human subjects (n=10) manually controlled a rotary handle to track a sinusoidally moving target as displayed on a computer screen. During movement, either the apparent handle inertia or tracking frequency changed to a higher or lower value. We analyzed the initial performance recovery following task perturbation using a linear fit of the velocity tracking error trends. For both types of task perturbations, we found significant increases in the intercept of the line fit (paired t-tests, two-tailed: p<.05) compared to trials with no change. We also found that adaptation rates indicated by the slope of the line fit of the tracking velocity error were larger for frequency changes than for apparent changes of the inertia for parameter increases (p=0.029, paired t-tests, one-tailed) and parameter decreases (p=0.055, paired t-tests, one-tailed). Our results provide evidence that humans use low impedance control that is task-specific to object parameters such as inertia. In addition, the results provide evidence that the adaptation to motion parameter changes and object parameter changes are different control processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005
Pages123-126
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 28 2005Jul 1 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics
Volume2005

Other

Other2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/28/057/1/05

Keywords

  • Internal model
  • Manual control
  • Motor adaptation
  • Motor control
  • Upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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