Involving families in an urban HIV preventive intervention: How community collaboration addresses barriers to participation

Anthony McCormick, Mary Mc Kernan McKay*, Maria Wilson, Ladora McKinney, Roberta Paikoff, Carl Bell, Donna Baptiste, Doris Coleman, Gregory Gillming, Sybil Madison, Richard Scott

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article addresses the increasing need within urban communities for effective, culturally relevant HIV prevention programs. The recruitment efforts of a family-based prevention program aimed at promoting health and preventing HIV risk exposure in urban, African American fourth and fifth grade children living in a community with high rates of HIV infection is detailed. The program, referred to as the CHAMP (Chicago HIV Prevention and Adolescent Mental Health Project) Family Program, is overseen by a collaborative partnership of community parents, school staff, and university-based researchers (Paikoff and McKay, 1995). The recruitment strategies developed as a result of this community-research collaboration are described. Preliminary results of the project's efforts to reach out to families within the targeted, inner-city community are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-307
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Involving families in an urban HIV preventive intervention: How community collaboration addresses barriers to participation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this