IRF5 haplotypes demonstrate diverse serological associations which predict serum interferon alpha activity and explain the majority of the genetic association with systemic lupus erythematosus

Timothy B. Niewold*, Jennifer A. Kelly, Silvia N. Kariuki, Beverly S. Franek, Akaash A. Kumar, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Kenaz Thomas, Daniel Walker, Stan Kamp, Jacqueline M. Frost, Andrew K. Wong, Joan T. Merrill, Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme, Mohammed Tikly, Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, John D. Reveille, Michelle A. Petri, Jeffrey C. Edberg, Robert P. Kimberly, Graciela S. AlarcónDiane L. Kamen, Gary S. Gilkeson, Timothy J. Vyse, Judith A. James, Patrick M. Gaffney, Kathy L. Moser, Mary K. Crow, John B. Harley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

106 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: High serum interferon α (IFNα) activity is a heritable risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Auto-antibodies found in SLE form immune complexes which can stimulate IFNα production by activating endosomal Toll-like receptors and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), including IRF5. Genetic variation in IRF5 is associated with SLE susceptibility; however, it is unclear how IRF5 functional genetic elements contribute to human disease. Methods: 1034 patients with SLE and 989 controls of European ancestry, 555 patients with SLE and 679 controls of African-American ancestry, and 73 patients with SLE of South African ancestry were genotyped at IRF5 polymorphisms, which define major haplotypes. Serum IFNα activity was measured using a functional assay. Results: In European ancestry subjects, anti-doublestranded DNA (dsDNA) and anti-Ro antibodies were each associated with different haplotypes characterised by a different combination of functional genetic elements (OR>2.56, p<1.9×10 -14 for both). These IRF5 haplotype-auto-antibody associations strongly predicted higher serum IFNα in patients with SLE and explained >70% of the genetic risk of SLE due to IRF5. In African- American patients with SLE a similar relationship between serology and IFNα was observed, although the previously described European ancestry-risk haplotype was present at admixture proportions in African-American subjects and absent in African patients with SLE. Conclusions: The authors define a novel risk haplotype of IRF5 that is associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies and show that risk of SLE due to IRF5 genotype is largely dependent upon particular auto-antibodies. This suggests that auto-antibodies are directly pathogenic in human SLE, resulting in increased IFNα in cooperation with particular combinations of IRF5 functional genetic elements. SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder affecting multiple organ systems including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal and haematopoietic systems. Humoral autoimmunity is a hallmark of SLE, and patients frequently have circulating auto-antibodies directed against dsDNA, as well as RNA binding proteins (RBP). Anti-RBP autoantibodies include antibodies which recognize Ro, La, Smith (anti-Sm), and ribonucleoprotein (anti-nRNP), collectively referred to as anti-retinol-binding protein). Anti-retinol-binding protein and anti-dsDNA auto-antibodies are rare in the healthy population. These auto-antibodies can be present in sera for years preceding the onset of clinical SLE illness and are likely pathogenic in SLE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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