Is Exposure to Intrapartum Prostaglandins for Labor Induction Associated with a Lower Incidence of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

Shannon L. Son*, Amanda A. Allshouse, Gretchen A. Heinrichs, Thomas J. Garite, Robert M. Silver, Ronald J. Wapner, William A. Grobman, Judith H. Chung, Brian M. Mercer, Torri D. Metz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is implicated in 30% of neonatal deaths. Since prostaglandins promote surfactant secretion and labor is associated with a lower risk of RDS in term neonates, it is plausible that synthetic prostaglandin (sPG) exposure is associated with a lower risk of RDS. Thus, we evaluated the association between sPG exposure and RDS in neonates born after the induction of labor (IOL). Study Design Secondary analysis of women with singleton pregnancies undergoing IOL at 34 0/7to 42 0/7weeks in the nuMoM2b study, a multicenter prospective cohort of nulliparous women. RDS rates and secondary neonatal outcomes in neonates with intrapartum sPG exposure were compared with those who had IOL with non-sPG methods (e.g., balloon catheter, amniotomy, oxytocin, and laminaria). Logistic regression models estimated the association of sPG with RDS and with secondary outcomes after adjustment for clinical and demographic factors (including gestational age). A sensitivity analysis was performed in which analysis was restricted to those with an admission cervical dilation ≤2 cm. Results Of 10,038 women in the total cohort, 3,071 met inclusion criteria; 1,444 were exposed and 1,627 were unexposed to sPGs. Antenatal corticosteroid exposure rates were low (3.0%) and similar between groups. In univariable analysis, neonates with sPG exposure had higher rates of RDS (3.2 vs. 2.0%, odds ratio [OR]: 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.50). This relationship was similar by gestational age at delivery (term vs. preterm, interaction p = 0.14). After adjustment, the association between sPG and RDS was no longer significant (adjusted odds ratio: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.9-2.3). When analysis was restricted to subjects with admission cervical dilation of ≤2 cm, there was also no association between sPG exposure and RDS. Conclusion In pregnancies between 34 and 42 weeks of gestation, exposure to sPG for cervical ripening or labor induction was not associated with newborn RDS. Key Points RDS is implicated in 30% of neonatal deaths. sPG exposure was not associated with RDS. Avoiding preterm birth remains crucial in RDS prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)993-998
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
Volume38
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

Keywords

  • induction of labor
  • neonatal morbidity
  • neonatal mortality
  • neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • prostaglandin
  • respiratory distress syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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