Is our absence as conspicuous as we think? Overestimating the salience and impact of one's absence from a group

Kenneth Savitsky*, Thomas Gilovich, Gail Berger, Victoria Husted Medvec

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research provides evidence that people overestimate the salience to others of their own absence from a group. Although individuals regard the removal of someone else from a group to be less salient than the addition of that person, they regard their own removal as every bit as salient as their addition (Study 1). Those absent from a group also expect their absence to be salient in the eyes of others, overestimating the extent to which their absence will be noticed by others (Study 2), and rating their absence as having had a larger impact on the group's subsequent functioning than others do (Study 3). Discussion focuses on individuals' assessments of their absence as an example of a broader egocentrism in social judgment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-392
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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