Is separation from the workplace a psychiatric emergency? The role of the clinician and the consultant

Greg P. Couser*, David Evan Morrison, Andrew O. Brown, Gaurava Agarwal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Separation from the workplace is generally disruptive. Although weath-ered well by some, it can result in a literal lethal outcome for others. Psychiatry in general would benefit from greater awareness and understanding of how and when separation from work becomes a psychiatric emergency. Psychiatrists are well versed in handling psychiatric emergencies of possible harm to self or others. However, there is less training regarding how to address problems that are at high risk for occurring whenever a patient leaves work. Psychiatrists are in an ideal posi-tion to prevent disability and adverse health outcomes associated with un-employment. This article explores the health hazards of unemployment (including increased risk of death), positive consequences of working, and the important role psychiatrists play in setting appropriate expecta-tions. Psychiatrists best serve patients and their employers by sustaining employment and helping their patients navigate workplace challenges and improve their work, which also likely to improve their self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-63
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatric Annals
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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