Is There an Association between Indication for Intrauterine Balloon Tamponade and Balloon Failure?

Moeun Son*, Brett D. Einerson, Patrick Schneider, Ian C. Fields, William A Grobman, Emily Stinnett Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Determine whether the indication for intrauterine balloon tamponade (IUBT) is associated with failure rates. Study Design Cohort study of women who underwent IUBT for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) from 2007 to 2014. The indication was categorized as uterine atony or placental-site bleeding. Primary outcome was IUBT failure, defined as the need for uterine artery embolization or hysterectomy. Secondary outcomes were estimated blood loss (EBL) after balloon placement, transfusion of red blood cells (RBC), transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or cryoprecipitate, and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Results 306 women underwent IUBT: 241 (78.8%) for uterine atony and 65 (21.2%) for placental site bleeding. Overall, 67 (21.9%) women experienced IUBT failure. The frequency of failure was similar in those with uterine atony compared with those with placental-site bleeding (21.2 vs 24.6%, p = 0.55). This finding persisted after adjusting for potential confounders (aOR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.48-1.99). Median EBL after balloon placement (190 [interquartile range, 93-375] vs 195 [interquartile range, 103-500] mL, p = 0.46), and frequencies of RBC transfusion (62.7 vs 66.2%, p = 0.60), FFP and/or cryoprecipitate transfusion (25.3 vs 33.8%, p = 0.17), and ICU admission (12.4 vs 16.9%, p = 0.35) were also similar. Conclusion IUBT was similarly effective for managing PPH from uterine atony or placental-site bleeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-168
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Keywords

  • intrauterine balloon tamponade
  • placental site bleeding
  • postpartum hemorrhage
  • uterine atony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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