Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis

Matteo Pardini*, Antonio Uccelli, Jordan Henry Grafman, Özgür Yaldizli, Gianluigi Mancardi, Luca Roccatagliata

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: While cognition can be affected during sensorimotor multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, the relevance of isolated cognitive relapses (ICRs ie, those occurring in absence of new sensorimotor symptoms) remain poorly characterised. Here, we decided to explore the relationship between ICR, subjective evaluation of cognitive performance and long-term cognitive decline in a group of subjects with relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: We analysed the cognitive performance of 99 clinically stable relapsing-remitting MS for whom data from four consequent clinical and cognitive evaluations were available, that is, a baseline evaluation (t0), followed in the subsequent 6 months by a second evaluation performed not later than 2 weeks after a routine brain scan positive for at least one area of gadolinium enhancement (t1) and two gadolinium enhancement-negative follow-up evaluations after 6 months (t2) and 1 year (t3) from t1. Based on published literature, we defined as a meaningful change in cognition a transient reduction of Symbol Digit Modalities Test score of at least four points at t1 compared with t0 and t2. Results: ICRs were found in 17 patients and were not associated with subjective cognitive deficits or depression. Subjects who presented with an ICR at t1 presented with a significantly reduced cognitive performance at the follow-up evaluations compared with patients without ICR. Conclusions and relevance: We showed that ICRs were not associated with changes in mood, fatigue levels or cognitive performance self-evaluations. Our study introduces an operational definition of ICRs and suggests to their role as a factor for cognitive decline in MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1035-1037
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume85
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Recurrence
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Gadolinium
Cognition
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Fatigue
Depression
Brain
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Pardini, M., Uccelli, A., Grafman, J. H., Yaldizli, Ö., Mancardi, G., & Roccatagliata, L. (2014). Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 85(9), 1035-1037. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2013-307275
Pardini, Matteo ; Uccelli, Antonio ; Grafman, Jordan Henry ; Yaldizli, Özgür ; Mancardi, Gianluigi ; Roccatagliata, Luca. / Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2014 ; Vol. 85, No. 9. pp. 1035-1037.
@article{158e15d69d3f4cf5afae8752556437d8,
title = "Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Objective: While cognition can be affected during sensorimotor multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, the relevance of isolated cognitive relapses (ICRs ie, those occurring in absence of new sensorimotor symptoms) remain poorly characterised. Here, we decided to explore the relationship between ICR, subjective evaluation of cognitive performance and long-term cognitive decline in a group of subjects with relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: We analysed the cognitive performance of 99 clinically stable relapsing-remitting MS for whom data from four consequent clinical and cognitive evaluations were available, that is, a baseline evaluation (t0), followed in the subsequent 6 months by a second evaluation performed not later than 2 weeks after a routine brain scan positive for at least one area of gadolinium enhancement (t1) and two gadolinium enhancement-negative follow-up evaluations after 6 months (t2) and 1 year (t3) from t1. Based on published literature, we defined as a meaningful change in cognition a transient reduction of Symbol Digit Modalities Test score of at least four points at t1 compared with t0 and t2. Results: ICRs were found in 17 patients and were not associated with subjective cognitive deficits or depression. Subjects who presented with an ICR at t1 presented with a significantly reduced cognitive performance at the follow-up evaluations compared with patients without ICR. Conclusions and relevance: We showed that ICRs were not associated with changes in mood, fatigue levels or cognitive performance self-evaluations. Our study introduces an operational definition of ICRs and suggests to their role as a factor for cognitive decline in MS.",
author = "Matteo Pardini and Antonio Uccelli and Grafman, {Jordan Henry} and {\"O}zg{\"u}r Yaldizli and Gianluigi Mancardi and Luca Roccatagliata",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/jnnp-2013-307275",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "1035--1037",
journal = "Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry",
issn = "0022-3050",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "9",

}

Pardini, M, Uccelli, A, Grafman, JH, Yaldizli, Ö, Mancardi, G & Roccatagliata, L 2014, 'Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 85, no. 9, pp. 1035-1037. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2013-307275

Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis. / Pardini, Matteo; Uccelli, Antonio; Grafman, Jordan Henry; Yaldizli, Özgür; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Roccatagliata, Luca.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 85, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 1035-1037.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Isolated cognitive relapses in multiple sclerosis

AU - Pardini, Matteo

AU - Uccelli, Antonio

AU - Grafman, Jordan Henry

AU - Yaldizli, Özgür

AU - Mancardi, Gianluigi

AU - Roccatagliata, Luca

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objective: While cognition can be affected during sensorimotor multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, the relevance of isolated cognitive relapses (ICRs ie, those occurring in absence of new sensorimotor symptoms) remain poorly characterised. Here, we decided to explore the relationship between ICR, subjective evaluation of cognitive performance and long-term cognitive decline in a group of subjects with relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: We analysed the cognitive performance of 99 clinically stable relapsing-remitting MS for whom data from four consequent clinical and cognitive evaluations were available, that is, a baseline evaluation (t0), followed in the subsequent 6 months by a second evaluation performed not later than 2 weeks after a routine brain scan positive for at least one area of gadolinium enhancement (t1) and two gadolinium enhancement-negative follow-up evaluations after 6 months (t2) and 1 year (t3) from t1. Based on published literature, we defined as a meaningful change in cognition a transient reduction of Symbol Digit Modalities Test score of at least four points at t1 compared with t0 and t2. Results: ICRs were found in 17 patients and were not associated with subjective cognitive deficits or depression. Subjects who presented with an ICR at t1 presented with a significantly reduced cognitive performance at the follow-up evaluations compared with patients without ICR. Conclusions and relevance: We showed that ICRs were not associated with changes in mood, fatigue levels or cognitive performance self-evaluations. Our study introduces an operational definition of ICRs and suggests to their role as a factor for cognitive decline in MS.

AB - Objective: While cognition can be affected during sensorimotor multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, the relevance of isolated cognitive relapses (ICRs ie, those occurring in absence of new sensorimotor symptoms) remain poorly characterised. Here, we decided to explore the relationship between ICR, subjective evaluation of cognitive performance and long-term cognitive decline in a group of subjects with relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: We analysed the cognitive performance of 99 clinically stable relapsing-remitting MS for whom data from four consequent clinical and cognitive evaluations were available, that is, a baseline evaluation (t0), followed in the subsequent 6 months by a second evaluation performed not later than 2 weeks after a routine brain scan positive for at least one area of gadolinium enhancement (t1) and two gadolinium enhancement-negative follow-up evaluations after 6 months (t2) and 1 year (t3) from t1. Based on published literature, we defined as a meaningful change in cognition a transient reduction of Symbol Digit Modalities Test score of at least four points at t1 compared with t0 and t2. Results: ICRs were found in 17 patients and were not associated with subjective cognitive deficits or depression. Subjects who presented with an ICR at t1 presented with a significantly reduced cognitive performance at the follow-up evaluations compared with patients without ICR. Conclusions and relevance: We showed that ICRs were not associated with changes in mood, fatigue levels or cognitive performance self-evaluations. Our study introduces an operational definition of ICRs and suggests to their role as a factor for cognitive decline in MS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905435676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905435676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/jnnp-2013-307275

DO - 10.1136/jnnp-2013-307275

M3 - Article

C2 - 24686566

AN - SCOPUS:84905435676

VL - 85

SP - 1035

EP - 1037

JO - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

SN - 0022-3050

IS - 9

ER -