Jim Copp's playhouse

Jacob Smith*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Jim Copp wrote, performed, and produced a series of children's phonograph records during the 1950s and 1960s. These records are stunning achievements in magnetic tape-era sound art, and were released and distributed by Playhouse Records, an independent record label operated by Copp and his business partner Ed Brown. The history of Playhouse Records adds to our knowledge of postwar sound art and independent media production, and reveals the potential for children's media to serve as an outlet for artists working on the fringes of the mainstream entertainment scene. In this essay, I situate Playhouse within the context of the postwar record industry, and listen to Copp's recordings with an ear to the intersection of sound studies, queer theory, and children's media culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-163
Number of pages18
JournalCreative Industries Journal
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Acoustic waves
Phonograph records
art
sound storage medium
media culture
Magnetic tape
entertainment
artist
recording
Labels
Industry
industry
history
Playhouse
Sound Art
Art
queer theory
Ear
Entertainment
Media Culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Smith, Jacob. / Jim Copp's playhouse. In: Creative Industries Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 146-163.
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Jim Copp's playhouse. / Smith, Jacob.

In: Creative Industries Journal, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 146-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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