Kiteboarding Induced Abdominal Wall Pain: Intercostal Neuroma versus Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment (ACNES)

Jenna Rose Stoehr, Ava G. Chappell, Gregory A. Dumanian*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary: Abdominal wall pain can be challenging to diagnose and treat, as many etiologies can have similar presentations. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome has been reported to be a significant cause of AWP. Here, we report the case of a patient who was initially diagnosed with anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome and ultimately found to have intercostal neuromas-in-continuity. The patient was a healthy 36-year-old man who presented with debilitating, chronic abdominal wall pain. The pain began after a time period when the patient was regularly kiteboarding, and it impacted the ability to exercise and perform activities of daily living. The patient had undergone extensive testing and attempted many treatments, including medication, nerve blocks, and anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome surgery. Examination was significant for 2 near-symmetric areas that were persistently tender to palpation in the subcostal abdomen. The patient underwent excision and reconstruction with two 2-cm segments of processed nerve allograft. At 1-year follow-up, the patient reported complete alleviation of the pain, discontinuation of pain medication, and a return to all normal activities. While managing patients with abdominal wall pain, physicians must consider neuroma in their differential diagnoses and be aware of its treatment options, as the patient underwent a substantial delay in treatment. Kiteboarding is a unique mechanism of peripheral nerve injury that has not been previously reported in the literature. This report demonstrates the efficacy of processed nerve allograft in the management of neuromas-in-continuity of the abdominal wall, as well as the importance of being aware of unusual manners of nerve injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere3487
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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