Labor market experiences of low-income black women in middle-class suburbs: Evidence from a survey of gautreaux program participants

Susan J. Popkin, James E. Rosenbaum, Patricia M. Meaden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reports on a highly unusual experiment in racial and economic integration, the Gautreaux program. This program helps black families who are either current or former residents of public housing move into subsidized housing in Chicago and its suburbs. Surveying a random sample of 332 participants, we find that suburban movers are significantly more likely to have a job post-move than city movers, even among those who had never had a job before moving. Multivariate analysis shows that these differences are significant even after controlling for respondents' previous work history, human capital, and personal characteristics. These results suggest that low-income urban blacks experience significant gains in employment by moving to middle-class suburbs. Thus, housing assistance may be an effective alternative to traditional welfare-to-work programs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-573
JournalJournal of Policy Analysis and Management
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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