Lactate dehydrogenase ontogeny, paternal gene activation, and tetramer assembly in embryos of brook trout, lake trout, and their hybrids

Erwin Goldberg*, J. P. Cuerrier, J. C. Ward

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Measurement of lactate dehydrogenase in reciprocal hybrids of trout during development revealed that a maternal effect was involved in the regulation of enzyme levels until resorption of the yolk sac was completed. Malate dehydrogenase specific activities were the same in these embryos and larvae. The more negatively charged B subunits of LDH predominated during early stages of embryogenesis in lake trout and brook trout with an increase in synthesis of A subunits evident as development progressed. Activation of the paternal A gene in reciprocal hybrids occurred at a relatively late stage with the LDH subunit specific to the retina appearing after hatching. Analysis of brook trout progeny from a cross of parental types with a variant and wild-type B subunit suggested nonrandom LDH tetramer assembly which may be genetically controlled.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-350
Number of pages16
JournalBiochemical Genetics
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1969

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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