Large-scale student projects - Problematic or preparatory for careers in engineering management?

Charles W.N. Thompson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Long before Sputnik pushed engineering schools into liberal science priorities, engineering (and business) curricula used individual and small group projects as a vehicle for teaching the disciplinary syllabus (and preparing students for the world of work where both engineering and management positions would require skills above and beyond basic technical education). In recent years, the insistence of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) on real world projects and industry's growing dependence on project teams (as distinguished from functional organizations) has reinforced the practice of using real (as distinguished from laboratory) projects. Large-scale student real world projects are far less common than individual or small group projects. The reasons for this may include the large cost in instructor's time, the difficulty in recruiting clients, and the difficulty in evaluating student groups. The experience of the author and of others will be drawn upon to examine these reasons and other advantages and disadvantages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication27th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2006 - Managing Change
Subtitle of host publicationManaging People and Technology in a Rapidly Changing World, ASEM 2006
Pages327-334
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event27th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2006 - Managing Change: Managing People and Technology in a Rapidly Changing World, ASEM 2006 - Huntsville, AL, United States
Duration: Oct 25 2006Oct 28 2006

Publication series

Name27th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2006 - Managing Change: Managing People and Technology in a Rapidly Changing World, ASEM 2006

Other

Other27th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2006 - Managing Change: Managing People and Technology in a Rapidly Changing World, ASEM 2006
CountryUnited States
CityHuntsville, AL
Period10/25/0610/28/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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