Lateralization on neuroimaging does not differentiate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease

Anne M. Lipton*, Raul Benavides, Linda S. Hynan, Frederick J. Bonte, Thomas S. Harris, Charles L. White, Eileen H. Bigio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lateralization on neuroimaging was compared in cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD; n = 10) and cases of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 17). All of the cases were pathologically confirmed and semi-quantitative and statistical parametric mapping methods were employed. Seven of the 10 FTLD cases had lateralization on at least one neuroimaging modality: single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), MRI, or CT. All 6/6 FTLD cases with SPECT showed lateralization. MRI results generally agreed with SPECT findings. Three of 4 FTLD cases had lateralized atrophy on CT. For the AD cases, 10/17 SPECTs, 2/7 MRIs, and 1/9 CTs showed lateralized findings. Of the neuroimaging modalities utilized, SPECT was the most sensitive in detecting lateralization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-327
Number of pages4
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Frontotemporal lobar degeneration
  • Single photon emission computerized tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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