Legal Integration in the Andes

Law-Making by the Andean Tribunal of Justice

Karen Alter*, Laurence R. Helfer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Andean Tribunal of Justice (ATJ) is a copy of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), and the third most active international court. This paper reviews our findings based on an original coding of all ATJ preliminary rulings from 1984 to 2007, and over 40 interviews in the region. We then compare Andean and European jurisprudence in three key areas: whether the Tribunals treat the founding integration treaties as constitutions for their respective communities, whether the ATJ and ECJ have implied powers for community institutions that are not expressly enumerated in the founding treaties and how the Tribunals conceive of the relationship between community law and other international agreements that are binding on the Member States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-715
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Law Journal
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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European Court of Justice
justice
treaty
Law
international agreement
European Law
jurisprudence
community
coding
constitution
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

Cite this

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Legal Integration in the Andes : Law-Making by the Andean Tribunal of Justice. / Alter, Karen; Helfer, Laurence R.

In: European Law Journal, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.09.2011, p. 701-715.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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