Long-term efficacy of computerized cognitive training among survivors of childhood cancer: A single-blind randomized controlled trial

Heather M. Conklin*, Jason M. Ashford, Kellie N. Clark, Karen Martin-Elbahesh, Kristina K. Hardy, Thomas E. Merchant, Robert J. Ogg, Sima Jeha, Lu Huang, Hui Zhang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To investigate the long-term efficacy of computerized cognitive training in improving cognitive outcomes among childhood cancer survivors. Methods Sixty-eight survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or brain tumor (BT) were randomly assigned to computerized cognitive intervention (23 ALL/11 BT, age = 12.21 ± 2.47) or a waitlist control group (24 ALL/10 BT, age = 11.82 ± 2.42). Cognitive assessments were completed pre-, immediately post-, and 6 months postintervention. Results A prior report showed training led to immediate improvement in working memory, attention and processing speed. In the current study, piecewise linear mixed effects modeling revealed that working memory and processing speed were unchanged from immediate to 6 months postintervention (intervention β=-.04 to .01, p = .26 to .95; control β=-.06 to .01, p = .23-.97), but group differences on an attention measure did not persist. Conclusion Cognitive benefits are maintained 6 months following computerized cognitive training, adding to potential clinical utility of this intervention approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-231
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Brain tumor
  • Computerized cognitive training
  • Leukemia
  • Pediatric
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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