Long-term follow-up of men undergoing modified inguinal lymphadenectomy for carcinoma of the penis

J. W. Colberg*, G. L. Andriole, W. J. Catalona

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. To determine the long-term outcome of men with carcinoma of the penis with clinically negative lymph nodes undergoing a modification of the standard inguinal lymphadenectomy. Patients and methods. The study included nine men (mean age 56.2 years, range 41-72) with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis who underwent a modified inguinal lymphadenectomy. Results. Of the nine patients, three had histologically positive lymph nodes; none of the patients with positive or negative nodes had evidence of recurrent disease. All patients were alive within a follow-up of 13-108 months (mean 67.5). Early post-operative complications occurred in two patients with skin-flap necrosis, one with prolonged lymphatic drainage and one with a delayed groin lymphocele and cellulitis. Conclusion. The modified inguinal lymphadenectomy is a reasonable alternative to surveillance and may accurately identify men with positive nodes. Long-term survival and low morbidity seem to justify this approach in men with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis and clinically negative inguinal lymph nodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-57
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Urology
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Keywords

  • Inguinal lymphadenectomy
  • Modified
  • Penile carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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