Long-term serologic follow-up of isolated hepatitis b core antibody in hiv-infected and hiv-uninfected women

Audrey L. French, Michael Y. Lin, Charlesnika T. Evans, Lorie Benning, Marshall J. Glesby, Mary A. Young, Eva A. Operskalski, Michael Augenbraun, Marion Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) is a common serologic finding in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but the outcome and clinical significance are uncertain. Methods. We performed repeated hepatitis B virus (HBV) serologic tests on women who participated in the Women's Interagency HIV Study and who had isolated anti-HBc at study entry. Results. Repeated serologic tests were performed for 322 women (282 HIV-infected and 40 HIV-uninfected) at a median of 7.5 years after study entry. Seventy-one percent of women retained isolated anti-HBc serologic status, 20% acquired antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), and 2% acquired hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). In unadjusted analysis, increasing age, injection drug use, and hepatitis C viremia were negatively associated with acquisition of anti-HBs. For HIV-infected women, predictors of acquisition of anti-HBs were an increase in CD4 cell count and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Receipt of drugs with activity against HBV and self-reported HBV vaccination did not predict anti-HBs acquisition. In the multivariable regression model, HAART use remained a significant predictor of anti-HBs acquisition, whereas women with hepatitis C viremia were more likely to retain isolated anti-HBc serologic status. Conclusions. Isolated anti-HBc status remained stable over time for the majority of women, especially women with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Development of anti-HBs was predicted by HAART use and an increase in CD4 cell count. We conclude that a proportion of HIV-infected women with isolated anti-HBc have prior natural HBV infection with anti-HBs that is at an undetectable level because of immune dysfunction. Isolated anti-HBc in the presence of chronic hepatitis C virus infection may be attributable to a different phenomenon, such as dysfunctional antibody production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-154
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term serologic follow-up of isolated hepatitis b core antibody in hiv-infected and hiv-uninfected women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this