Longitudinal Assessment and Functional Neuroimaging of Movement Variability Reveal Novel Insights into Motor Dysfunction in Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

Derek J. Dean*, Jessica A. Bernard, Katherine S.F. Damme, Randall O'reilly, Joseph M. Orr, Vijay A. Mittal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Motor dysfunction in youth at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis is thought to reflect abnormal neurodevelopment within cortical-subcortical motor circuits and may be important for understanding clinical trajectories of CHR individuals. However, to date, our perspective of brain-behavior relationships has been informed solely by cross-sectional correlational studies linking behavior in the lab to brain structure or respective resting-state network connectivity. Here, we assess movement dysfunction from 2 perspectives: study 1 investigates the longitudinal progression of handwriting variability and positive symptoms in a sample of 91 CHR and healthy controls during a 12-month follow-up and study 2 involves a multiband functional magnetic resonance imaging task exploring the relationship between power grip force stability and motor network brain activation in a subset of participants. In study 1, we found that greater handwriting variability was a stable feature of CHR participants who experienced worse symptom progression. Study 2 results showed that CHR individuals had greater variability in their grip force and greater variability was related to decreased activation in the associative cortico-striatal network compared to controls. Motor variability may be a stable marker of vulnerability for psychosis risk and possible indicator of a vulnerable cortico-striatal brain network functioning in CHR participants, although the effects of antipsychotic medication should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1567-1576
Number of pages10
JournalSchizophrenia bulletin
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

Keywords

  • clinical high risk
  • functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • handwriting
  • longitudinal
  • motor control
  • power grip
  • variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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