Longitudinal fMRI task reveals neural plasticity in default mode network with disrupted executive-default coupling and selective attention after traumatic brain injury

Shun Chin Jim Wu, Lisanne M. Jenkins, Alexandra C. Apple, Julie Petersen, Furen Xiao, Lei Wang, Fan pei Gloria Yang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Executive dysfunctions are common in individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). However, change in functional neural coupling of default and executive networks in the post-acute phase (≥ 1 month after injury) patients over time has yet to be understood. During a 5-week observation period, we examined changes in the goal-oriented executive function networks in 20 TBI participants, using a face/scene matching 1-back fMRI task (Chen et al. 2011). We conducted multivariate pattern analysis to assess working memory and visual selective attention, followed by a repeat-measures ANOVA to examine longitudinal changes, with a cluster FDR at p =.001. Results showed that task accuracy significantly improved after follow-up. Significantly increased activity patterns over time were observed in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right insula. Decreased activity patterns were seen in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), bilateral precuneus, right inferior occipital gyrus and right temporo-occipital junction. Improvement in task accuracy correlated with decreased activity patterns in the PCC (r = −0.478, p = 0.031) and temporo-occipital junction (r = −0.592, p = 0.006), which were interpreted as neural plastic changes. However, we did not observe the default mode network (DMN)-executive network decoupling during task performance that is found in other studies. These results suggest that fMRI of attentional task performance could serve as a potential biomarker for neural plasticity of selective attention in TBI patients in the post-acute phase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1638-1650
Number of pages13
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • Executive function
  • Machine learning
  • Multivariate
  • Plasticity
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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