Looking up versus looking down: Attractiveness-based organizational biases are moderated by social comparison direction

Maria Agthe*, Matthias Spörrle, Dieter Frey, Jon K. Maner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Organizational decision-making research demonstrates an abundance of positive biases directed toward attractive individuals. However, recent research suggests that these favorable consequences of attractiveness do not hold when the person being evaluated is of the same sex as the evaluator. In the current study, participants evaluated prospective job candidates and indicated their desire to interact socially with the candidate. Results indicated positive responses toward attractive other-sex targets but not toward attractive same-sex targets. This pattern was moderated by participants' social comparison orientation: People who tended to engage in downward (rather than upward) social comparison displayed stronger reactions to attractive comparison targets. They indicated less desire to interact socially with attractive same-sex job candidates than those who tend to engage in upward social comparison.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-45
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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