Low Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies after Natural Infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in a Community-Based Serological Study

Thomas W. McDade, Amelia Sancilio, Richard D'Aquila, Brian Mustanski, Lauren A. Vaught, Nina L. Reiser, Matthew E. Velez, Ryan R. Hsieh, Daniel T. Ryan, Rana Saber, Elizabeth M. McNally, Alexis R. Demonbreun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Confidence in natural immunity after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is one reason for vaccine hesitancy. Methods: We measured antibody-mediated neutralization of spike protein-ACE2 receptor binding in a large community-based sample of seropositive individuals who differed in severity of infection (N = 790). Results: A total of 39.8% of infections were asymptomatic, 46.5% were symptomatic with no clinical care, 13.8% were symptomatic with clinical care, and 3.7% required hospitalization. Moderate/high neutralizing activity was present after 41.3% of clinically managed infections, in comparison with 7.9% of symptomatic and 1.9% of asymptomatic infections. Conclusions: Prior coronavirus disease 2019 infection does not guarantee a high level of antibody-mediated protection against reinfection in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberofac055
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Serological testing
  • Vaccination
  • neutralizing antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Low Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies after Natural Infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in a Community-Based Serological Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this