Low prevalence of HIV in high-risk seronegative homosexual men evidenced by virus culture and polymerase chain reaction

Phalguni Gupta, Lawrence Kingsley, Roger Anderson, Monto Ho, Amy Enrico, Ming Ding, Martin Cottrill, Steven Wolinsky, Charles Rinaldo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the presence of covert HIV-1 infection. Setting: High-risk seronegative homosexual men from the Pittsburgh portion of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study were examined for the presence of HIV-1 infection. Patients, participants: Ten men (group 1) were examined prospectively for the presence of HIV-1 in their freshly-obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Furthermore, cryopreserved PBMC from 26 men (group 2) at their first visit (1984-1985) were examined retrospectively for the presence of HIV-1. Main outcome measures: PBMC samples from groups 1 and 2 were examined for HIV-1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using gag, env and strong-stop (long terminal repeat) specific primers. In addition, fresh PBMC samples from group 1 were examined for HIV-1 by virus culture. Results: None of the 10 PBMC samples from group 1 were positive for virus culture and PCR. Only one of the 26 men from group 2 was positive for gag and strong-stop DNA sequences. This PCR-positive, seronegative subject was found to be negative for HIV-1 by PCR at follow-up visits up to 48 months later. None of 15 seronegative, low-risk homosexual men and 12 seronegative heterosexual men were found to be PCR-positive for HIV-1. However, six HlV-1-seropositive men were positive by PCR for gag, env, and strong-stop HIV-1 DNA sequences. Conclusions: These results suggest a low prevalence of covert HIV-1 infection in high-risk seronegative homosexual men in our geographic area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Keywords

  • HIV
  • PCR
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Seronegative
  • Virus culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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