Low Vitamin D status among pregnant Latin American and Caribbean women with HIV Infection

Jennifer Jao*, Laura Freimanis, Marisa M. Mussi-Pinhata, Rachel A. Cohen, Jacqueline P. Monteiro, Maria L. Cruz, Rhoda S. Sperling, Andrea Branch, George K. Siberry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the prevalence and predictors of low vitamin D status among pregnant women with HIV infection. Methods The present cross-sectional study analyzed repository specimens collected at 12-34 weeks of pregnancy among women enrolled across 17 sites in Latin America and the Caribbean between 2002 and 2009. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify factors associated with low vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D < 30 ng/mL). Results Among 715 women, 218 (30.5%) were vitamin D deficient (< 20 ng/mL) and 252 (35.2%) were insufficient (21-29 ng/mL). Factors associated with low vitamin D status included residence in subtropical latitudes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-2.88), assessment during non-summer seasons (autumn: aOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.20-2.86; spring: 4.3, 2.65-6.95; winter: 10.82, 5.74-20.41), employment (aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.06-2.38), and assessment before 20 weeks of pregnancy (aOR 1.89, 95% CI 1.18-3.06). Factors protective against low vitamin D status were CD4 count below 200 cells per mm3 (aOR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.77) and protease inhibitors (aOR 0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.95). Conclusion Low vitamin D status was prevalent among pregnant women with HIV infection. Further studies are warranted to identify the impact of low maternal vitamin D status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-58
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume130
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Caribbean
  • HIV
  • Latin America
  • Pregnancy
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Low Vitamin D status among pregnant Latin American and Caribbean women with HIV Infection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this