Macrolide resistance and emm type distribution of invasive pediatric group A streptococcal isolates

Three-year prospective surveillance from a children's hospital

Preeti Jaggi*, Bernard Beall, Jason Rippe, Robert R Tanz, Stanford T Shulman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Macrolide-resistant group A streptococci (GAS) have been suggested to have more invasive potential. An M protein-based GAS vaccine is currently in development. We sought to define the GAS emm types and macrolide resistance rates among pediatric invasive GAS isolates collected prospectively during a recent 40-month period at our children's hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively identified and collected GAS isolates from patients with invasive GAS disease (isolates from normally sterile sites). Susceptibility assays for erythromycin and clindamycin were performed by E-test. emm typing was performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinical characteristics of patients were identified by chart review. RESULTS: A total of 37 patient isolates were identified, of which 35 isolates were able to be characterized. Four patients had underlying illness. No macrolide resistance was detected among the isolates. The most common emm types causing invasive disease were emm 1.0 (43%) and emm 12.0 (11.1%). CONCLUSIONS: In this group of 35 invasive GAS isolates, no cases of macrolide resistance were found. emm type 1 accounted for the highest percentage of invasive disease, followed by emm type 12. The type-specific GAS M protein-based vaccine currently in development includes the emm types of 33 of 35 (94%) of the invasive emm types in this series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-255
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Macrolides
Streptococcus
Pediatrics
Vaccines
Clindamycin
Erythromycin
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Proteins

Keywords

  • emm/M type
  • Group A streptococcus
  • Macrolide resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{6585da2bd5a9474d992140c0371462e4,
title = "Macrolide resistance and emm type distribution of invasive pediatric group A streptococcal isolates: Three-year prospective surveillance from a children's hospital",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Macrolide-resistant group A streptococci (GAS) have been suggested to have more invasive potential. An M protein-based GAS vaccine is currently in development. We sought to define the GAS emm types and macrolide resistance rates among pediatric invasive GAS isolates collected prospectively during a recent 40-month period at our children's hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively identified and collected GAS isolates from patients with invasive GAS disease (isolates from normally sterile sites). Susceptibility assays for erythromycin and clindamycin were performed by E-test. emm typing was performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinical characteristics of patients were identified by chart review. RESULTS: A total of 37 patient isolates were identified, of which 35 isolates were able to be characterized. Four patients had underlying illness. No macrolide resistance was detected among the isolates. The most common emm types causing invasive disease were emm 1.0 (43{\%}) and emm 12.0 (11.1{\%}). CONCLUSIONS: In this group of 35 invasive GAS isolates, no cases of macrolide resistance were found. emm type 1 accounted for the highest percentage of invasive disease, followed by emm type 12. The type-specific GAS M protein-based vaccine currently in development includes the emm types of 33 of 35 (94{\%}) of the invasive emm types in this series.",
keywords = "emm/M type, Group A streptococcus, Macrolide resistance",
author = "Preeti Jaggi and Bernard Beall and Jason Rippe and Tanz, {Robert R} and Shulman, {Stanford T}",
year = "2007",
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doi = "10.1097/01.inf.0000256761.10463.29",
language = "English (US)",
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journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
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T1 - Macrolide resistance and emm type distribution of invasive pediatric group A streptococcal isolates

T2 - Three-year prospective surveillance from a children's hospital

AU - Jaggi, Preeti

AU - Beall, Bernard

AU - Rippe, Jason

AU - Tanz, Robert R

AU - Shulman, Stanford T

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Macrolide-resistant group A streptococci (GAS) have been suggested to have more invasive potential. An M protein-based GAS vaccine is currently in development. We sought to define the GAS emm types and macrolide resistance rates among pediatric invasive GAS isolates collected prospectively during a recent 40-month period at our children's hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively identified and collected GAS isolates from patients with invasive GAS disease (isolates from normally sterile sites). Susceptibility assays for erythromycin and clindamycin were performed by E-test. emm typing was performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinical characteristics of patients were identified by chart review. RESULTS: A total of 37 patient isolates were identified, of which 35 isolates were able to be characterized. Four patients had underlying illness. No macrolide resistance was detected among the isolates. The most common emm types causing invasive disease were emm 1.0 (43%) and emm 12.0 (11.1%). CONCLUSIONS: In this group of 35 invasive GAS isolates, no cases of macrolide resistance were found. emm type 1 accounted for the highest percentage of invasive disease, followed by emm type 12. The type-specific GAS M protein-based vaccine currently in development includes the emm types of 33 of 35 (94%) of the invasive emm types in this series.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Macrolide-resistant group A streptococci (GAS) have been suggested to have more invasive potential. An M protein-based GAS vaccine is currently in development. We sought to define the GAS emm types and macrolide resistance rates among pediatric invasive GAS isolates collected prospectively during a recent 40-month period at our children's hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively identified and collected GAS isolates from patients with invasive GAS disease (isolates from normally sterile sites). Susceptibility assays for erythromycin and clindamycin were performed by E-test. emm typing was performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinical characteristics of patients were identified by chart review. RESULTS: A total of 37 patient isolates were identified, of which 35 isolates were able to be characterized. Four patients had underlying illness. No macrolide resistance was detected among the isolates. The most common emm types causing invasive disease were emm 1.0 (43%) and emm 12.0 (11.1%). CONCLUSIONS: In this group of 35 invasive GAS isolates, no cases of macrolide resistance were found. emm type 1 accounted for the highest percentage of invasive disease, followed by emm type 12. The type-specific GAS M protein-based vaccine currently in development includes the emm types of 33 of 35 (94%) of the invasive emm types in this series.

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