Macromolecular gradients in corneal stroma

J. W. Ruberti*, H. Gong, T. F. Freddo, S. D. Klyce, M. Johnson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated an increased concentration of several macromolecules in the anterior corneal stroma as compared to the posterior stroma. Possible mechanisms generating these gradients include volume exclusion, preferential binding and/or convection. One of these potential causes, convective flow driven by a combination of evaporation from the tear film and intraocular pressure, is examined here numerically. A one-dimensional, corneal transport model is used to estimate the average posterior-to-anterior (PA) flow rate. This fluid velocity is then applied to a simpler advection-diffusion model to estimate the magnitude of an albumin gradient in the PA direction. It was found that the influence of convection on the distribution of soluble albumin may contribute significantly to observed gradients in the corneal stroma. These results suggest that alteration of either the supply of a given protein to the cornea (e.g. granular corneal dystrophy (GCD)) or the convective flow rate (e.g. contact lens wear) may enhance the normal gradient of soluble macromolecules in the corneal tissue. The possibility that gradients in the local chemical composition of the stroma are driven ultimately by tear film evaporation has important clinical implications. It is concluded that a full understanding of the mechanisms behind some poorly understood corneal disorders (GCD) or responses to contact lens wear may require the consideration of the physiological phenomena that combine to establish the local stromal chemical milieu.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages1315
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume2
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Macromolecular gradients in corneal stroma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this