Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with pancreatitis: Evaluation of signal intensity and enhancement changes

Gregory T. Sica*, Frank H. Miller, Germaine Rodriguez, Jeffrey McTavish, Peter A. Banks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the utility of unenhanced and enhanced T1-weighted fat-suppressed (T1-FS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting pancreatitis. Materials and Methods: 1.5-T MRI was performed in 25 patients with acute and 23 patients with chronic pancreatitis and in 20 control subjects without known pancreatic disease. T1-FS spin-echo and contrast-enhanced arterial-predominant (DYN1) and portal-predominant (DYN2) fast multiplanar spoiled gradient-echo (FMPSPGR) sequences were evaluated. These three sets of images were evaluated both subjectively for decreased or heterogeneous signal intensity (rating scale, 0-3) and objectively (region of interest (ROI)) in the head, body, and tail of the pancreas, in each patient. Results: Good correlation between subjective assessment and objective data was demonstrated. The T1-FS sequence showed an abnormality with greater frequency (T1-FS > DYN1, 81/144 scores; T1-FS = DYN1, 63/144 scores; T1-FS < DYN1, 0/144 scores) and magnitude (average subjective score, 2.48 vs. 1.74; P < 0.0003) than that of the contrast-enhanced FMPSPGR (decreased or heterogeneous enhancement). The overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI was 92% and 50%, respectively. On the basis of signal intensity and enhancement, MRI was not able to differentiate acute from chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: MRI was highly sensitive for disease detection, particularly using the T1-FS sequence, but using the sequences described, was not able to differentiate acute from chronic pancreatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-284
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2002

Keywords

  • Comparative studies
  • Computed tomography (CT), comparative studies
  • Magnetic resonance (MR)
  • Pancreas, MR
  • Pancreatitis
  • Tissue characterization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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