Maintaining commitment in the presence of alternative opportunities: The role of motivations for prevention or promotion

Chin Ming Hui*, Daniel C Molden

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines how broad motivations for security (prevention) or growth (promotion) differentially affect commitment to a chosen course of action in the presence of alternatives. Past research has demonstrated that when prevention-focused, people represent goals as standards that they feel obligated to maintain, whereas when promotion-focused, people represent goals as opportunities that they could ideally attain. Accordingly, prevention-focused individuals should be more likely to show sustained commitment to an existing goal when presented with desirable alternatives whereas promotion-focused individuals should be more likely to shift their effort and attention toward these alternatives. Two studies confirmed that, compared to promotion-focused individuals, prevention-focused individuals showed preferences to retain chosen objects even when offered more desirable options (Study 1), and showed a greater spread in their evaluations of chosen over non-chosen options post-choice (Study 2).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-584
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Cognition
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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