Make My Memory: How Advertising Can Change Our Memories of the Past

Kathryn A. Braun*, Rhiannon Ellis, Elizabeth F. Loftus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

170 Scopus citations

Abstract

Marketers use autobiographical advertising as a means to create nostalgia for their products. This research explores whether such referencing can cause people to believe that they had experiences as children that are mentioned in the ads. In Experiment 1, participants viewed an ad for Disney that suggested that they shook hands with Mickey Mouse as a child. Relative to controls, the ad increased their confidence that they personally had shaken hands with Mickey as a child at a Disney resort. The increased confidence could be due to a revival of a true memory or the creation of a new, false one. In Experiment 2, participants viewed an ad for Disney that suggested that they shook hands with an impossible character (e.g., Bugs Bunny). Again, relative to controls, the ad increased confidence that they personally had shaken hands with the impossible character as a child at a Disney resort. The increased confidence is consistent with the notion that autobiographical referencing can lead to the creation of false or distorted memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

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