Making prudent vs. impulsive choices: The role of anticipated shame and guilt on consumer self-control

Hae Eun Chun*, Vanessa M. Patrick, Deborah J. MacInnis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examine the differential effects of anticipating shame vs. guilt on choice likelihood of a hedonic product. The results demonstrate that when offered a hedonic snack (chocolate cake) consumers who anticipate shame are significantly less likely to choose to consume it compared to those who anticipate guilt. Anticipating guilt also has a more circumscribed effect, impacting choice like-lihood only for those consumers who are not attitudinally inclined toward the hedonic product. The results also show that anticipating guilt versus shame has different effects on anticipated happiness after lapses in self-control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-719
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume34
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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