Managing Groin Wounds after Infrainguinal Vascular Procedures: Examining the Reoperative Events and Complication Profile of Muscle Flap Reconstruction

Michael N. Mirzabeigi*, John P. Fischer, Marten N. Basta, Megan Fracol, Stephen J. Kovach, Liza C. Wu, Joseph M. Serletti, David W. Low, Suhail Kanchwala

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The literature has been void of large outcome studies detailing the efficacy and complication profile of muscle flap reconstruction of complex groin wounds. Furthermore, a first-line choice for muscle flap selection remains unclear. The aim of this study is 2-fold: (1) to examine the complication profile and associated risk factors following muscle flap coverage and (2) to provide a compared efficacy analysis of the sartorius muscle flap (SMF) versus the rectus femoris flap (RFF) in the treatment of wounds following an infrainguinal vascular procedure. Methods A retrospective review of records was performed on all patients undergoing complex groin wound reconstruction from January 2005 to September 2014. Results A total of 201 flaps were performed on 184 patients. There were no sentinel bleeding events through the course of graft salvage or perioperative morbidity beyond local wound complications. Coronary artery disease (P = 0.049), dyslipidemia (P < 0.001), diabetes (P = 0.047), and history of multiple prior infrainguinal procedures (P = 0.029) were associated with increased complications following groin wound reconstruction. There was no statistically significant difference in complications in comparing the RFF versus the SMF (27.9% vs. 38.9% respectively; P = 0.109). There was no significant difference in the rates of graft salvage in comparing the RFF versus the SMF (21.6% vs. 16.1%, respectively; P = 0.459). Conclusions Muscle flap coverage can be safely employed for vascular graft salvage. Medical comorbidities and multiple prior infrainguinal procedures are predictive of perioperative complications. The SMF and RFF demonstrated equivocal rates of complications and graft salvage. Given that the RFF risks increased functional morbidity and necessitates a second donor site, the SMF may be considered as an effective first-line approach for reconstruction of complex groin wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-241
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of vascular surgery
Volume43
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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