Master's level providers in health service psychology: An idea that has come and passed, and now must come again

Jason J Washburn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

High rates of mental disorders persist globally, resulting in substantial burden for individuals, their families, and society. Although health service psychology (HSP) has much to contribute to the effort to reduce the burden of mental disorders, doctoral-level HSP providers are unlikely to meet the demand for services over the next decade. The vast majority of the mental health workforce is licensed at the master's level, yet the doctorate has remained the requirement for entry-level practice of HSP. The available evidence, however, suggests that the level of clinical training involved in doctoral education is not necessary to address common mental disorders. Now that the American Psychological Association has finally embraced accreditation of master's programs in HSP, an opportunity exists to educate and train the next generation of providers to effectively and efficiently address the persistent burden of mental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-99
Number of pages8
JournalTraining and Education in Professional Psychology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • Accreditation
  • Burden of mental illness
  • Health service psychology
  • Master's degree
  • Workforce

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

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