Measurement of ankle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy using a manual spasticity evaluator

Qiyu Peng*, Parag K Shah, Ruud W. Selles, Deborah J Gaebler-Spira, Li Qun Zhang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spastic hypertonia involving spasticity and/or contracture is a major source of disability in cerebral palsy and other neurological impairments like stroke. Several measures have been used to assess the reflex hyperexcitability and hypertonus associated with spasticity, including the Ashworth scale, tendon reflex scale, pendulum test, mechanical perturbations and passive joint ROM. These measures generally are either convenient to use in clinics but not quantitative or they are quantitative but difficult to use conveniently in clinics. We developed a manual spasticity evaluator (MSE) to evaluate the spasticity/contracture quantitatively and conveniently in a clinical setting. Using the MSE, we measured the ankle ROM at controlled low velocity, elastic stiffness, and Tardieu R1 catch angle at different velocities. The results show decreased ROM and increased stiffness in spastic ankle, and the Tardieu R1 catch angle was approximately linearly related to the movement velocity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4896-4899
Number of pages4
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 VII
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventConference Proceedings - 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2004 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 1 2004Sep 5 2004

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Manual spasticity evaluator
  • Tardieu scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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