Measuring information preferences

Emily H. Ho, David Hagmann, George Loewenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in medical testing and widespread access to the internet have made it easier than ever to obtain information. Yet, when it comes to some of the most important decisions in life, people often choose to remain ignorant for a variety of psychological and economic reasons. We design and validate an information preferences scale to measure an individual’s desire to obtain or avoid information that may be unpleasant but could improve future decisions. The scale measures information preferences in three domains that are psychologically and materially consequential: consumer finance, personal characteristics, and health. In three studies incorporating responses from over 2,300 individuals, we present tests of the scale’s reliability and validity. We show that the scale predicts a real decision to obtain (or avoid) information in each of the domains as well as decisions from out-of-sample, unrelated domains. Across settings, many respondents prefer to remain in a state of active ignorance even when information is freely available. Moreover, we find that information preferences are a stable trait but that an individual’s preference for information can differ across domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-145
Number of pages20
JournalManagement Science
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Economics: behavior and behavioral decision making
  • Information avoidance
  • Organizational studies: motivation incentives
  • Psychometric
  • Utility preference: applications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

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