Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method

Jun Yao*, Michael D Ellis, Julius P A Dewald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanisms underlying discoordination, expressed in the form of obligatory coupling between the shoulder and the elbow muscles following stroke, are probed by simultaneously recording 163-channel EEG together with elbow/shoulder torques and EMGs from the upper arm. With this unique experimental protocol, we were able to have strict post hoc control of a subject's motor performance. Using this novel approach, this paper provides the first evidence of a linear relationship between an overlap in the cortical activities and obligatory shoulder/elbow torque coupling. Furthermore, results obtained from an 8 weeks multi-degree of freedom isometric training protocol showed that a well-designed treatment intervention could reduce obligatory torque coupling following stroke. Preliminary data indicates that this change in torque coupling appears to be associated with brain reorganization. Other potential rehabilitation methods based on an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying discoordination following stroke are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005
Pages4138-4141
Number of pages4
Volume7 VOLS
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005 - Shanghai, China
Duration: Sep 1 2005Sep 4 2005

Other

Other2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005
CountryChina
CityShanghai
Period9/1/059/4/05

Fingerprint

Torque
Patient rehabilitation
Rehabilitation
Elbow
Stroke
Imaging techniques
Electroencephalography
Muscle
Brain
Arm
Muscles
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Yao, J., Ellis, M. D., & Dewald, J. P. A. (2005). Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method. In Proceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005 (Vol. 7 VOLS, pp. 4138-4141). [1615374]
Yao, Jun ; Ellis, Michael D ; Dewald, Julius P A. / Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method. Proceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005. Vol. 7 VOLS 2005. pp. 4138-4141
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abstract = "Mechanisms underlying discoordination, expressed in the form of obligatory coupling between the shoulder and the elbow muscles following stroke, are probed by simultaneously recording 163-channel EEG together with elbow/shoulder torques and EMGs from the upper arm. With this unique experimental protocol, we were able to have strict post hoc control of a subject's motor performance. Using this novel approach, this paper provides the first evidence of a linear relationship between an overlap in the cortical activities and obligatory shoulder/elbow torque coupling. Furthermore, results obtained from an 8 weeks multi-degree of freedom isometric training protocol showed that a well-designed treatment intervention could reduce obligatory torque coupling following stroke. Preliminary data indicates that this change in torque coupling appears to be associated with brain reorganization. Other potential rehabilitation methods based on an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying discoordination following stroke are discussed.",
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Yao, J, Ellis, MD & Dewald, JPA 2005, Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method. in Proceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005. vol. 7 VOLS, 1615374, pp. 4138-4141, 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005, Shanghai, China, 9/1/05.

Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method. / Yao, Jun; Ellis, Michael D; Dewald, Julius P A.

Proceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005. Vol. 7 VOLS 2005. p. 4138-4141 1615374.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Yao J, Ellis MD, Dewald JPA. Mechanisms and rehabilitation of discoordination following stroke using a cortical imaging method. In Proceedings of the 2005 27th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, IEEE-EMBS 2005. Vol. 7 VOLS. 2005. p. 4138-4141. 1615374