Meconium in the Amniotic Fluid of Pregnancies Complicated by Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes is Associated With Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis

Michael J. Kupfermine, Elizabeth Wickstrom, Nam H. Gho, Patricia M. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study was to determine the significance of meconium in the amniotic fluid of pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) without labor. Methods: A case-control study of 31 pregnancies complicated by PPROM at 27-36 weeks gestation with meconium present (study group) and 93 pregnancies complicated by PPROM but without meconium was performed. The patients were matched for year of delivery, gestational age, race, and parity. Pregnancy and neonatal outcome variables of the 2 groups were compared. Results: The incidence of early onset neonatal sepsis was significantly increased in the study group (16.1% vs. 1.1%; P < 0.001). Similarly, chorioamnionitis (48.3% vs. 22.5%; P < 0.01), cesarean delivery for a nonreassuring fetal heart rate pattern (19.4% vs. 3.2%; P < 0.01), a 5-min Apgar score < 7 (22.5% vs. 8.6%; P < 0.05), and fetal growth retardation (FGR) (12.9% vs. 2.2%; P < 0.05) were also more common in pregnancies complicated by PPROM with meconium. The mean umbilical cord arterial pH was significantly lower in these pregnancies (7.18 ± 0.07 vs. 7.28 ± 0.08; P < 0.001). After controlling for confounding variables with multiple logistic regression analysis, we found that meconium in the amniotic fluid remained associated with early onset neonatal sepsis. Conclusions: The presence of meconium in the amniotic fluid of pregnancies complicated by PPROM is associated with an increased incidence of early onset neonatal group B ß-hemolytic streptococcus (GBBS) sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-27
Number of pages6
JournalInfectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Keywords

  • Neonatal infection
  • group B ß-hemolytic streptococcus
  • intraamniotic infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Infectious Diseases

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