Medication adherence mediates the relationship between adherence self-efficacy and biological assessments of HIV health among those with alcohol use disorders

Jeffrey T. Parsons*, Elana Rosof, Brian Mustanski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examines the relationship between negative consequences of alcohol use, adherence self-efficacy, medication adherence, and biological markers of HIV health (CD4 count and viral load). A total of 275 HIV-positive men and women with alcohol use disorders were surveyed using Audio-CASI measures and time line followback interviews. Findings from a structural equation model suggest that negative consequences related to alcohol use did not directly impact HIV health. Adherence self-efficacy had direct effects on viral load, but not CD4 count. Mediation analyses indicated that self-reported adherence partially mediated the relationship between adherence self-efficacy and viral load. Cognitive-oriented interventions aimed at facilitating adherence self-efficacy may be effective in improving both medication adherence and HIV health. If facilitating confidence improves HIV health, then health care providers can make a strong impact by spending a few short minutes themselves and/or partnering with behavioral health clinicians using techniques like motivational enhancement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-103
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Alcohol
  • CD4
  • Self-efficacy
  • Viral load

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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