Medication understanding, non-adherence, and clinical outcomes among adult kidney transplant recipients

Rachel E. Patzer, Marina Serper, Peter P. Reese, Kamila Przytula, Rachel Koval, Daniela P. Ladner, Josh M. Levitsky, Michael M. Abecassis, Michael S. Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

We sought to evaluate the prevalence of medication understanding and non-adherence of entire drug regimens among kidney transplantation (KT) recipients and to examine associations of these exposures with clinical outcomes. Structured, in-person interviews were conducted with 99 adult KT recipients between 2011 and 2012 at two transplant centers in Chicago, IL; and Atlanta, GA. Nearly, one-quarter (24%) of participants had limited literacy as measured by the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine test; patients took a mean of 10 (SD=4) medications and 32% had a medication change within the last month. On average, patients knew what 91% of their medications were for (self-report) and demonstrated proper dosing (via observed demonstration) for 83% of medications. Overall, 35% were non-adherent based on either self-report or tacrolimus level. In multivariable analyses, fewer months since transplant and limited literacy were associated with non-adherence (all P<.05). Patients with minority race, a higher number of medications, and mild cognitive impairment had significantly lower treatment knowledge scores. Non-white race and lower income were associated with higher rates of hospitalization within a year following the interview. The identification of factors that predispose KT recipients to medication misunderstanding, non-adherence, and hospitalization could help target appropriate self-care interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1294-1305
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Kidney Transplantation
Kidney
Transplant Recipients
Self Report
Hospitalization
Interviews
Transplants
Mild Cognitive Impairment
Tacrolimus
Self Care
Medicine

Keywords

  • cognition
  • hospitalization
  • kidney transplantation
  • literacy
  • medication adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Medication understanding, non-adherence, and clinical outcomes among adult kidney transplant recipients. / Patzer, Rachel E.; Serper, Marina; Reese, Peter P.; Przytula, Kamila; Koval, Rachel; Ladner, Daniela P.; Levitsky, Josh M.; Abecassis, Michael M.; Wolf, Michael S.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1294-1305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patzer RE, Serper M, Reese PP, Przytula K, Koval R, Ladner DP et al. Medication understanding, non-adherence, and clinical outcomes among adult kidney transplant recipients. Clinical Transplantation. 2016 Oct 1;30(10):1294-1305. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/ctr.12821

Patzer, Rachel E.; Serper, Marina; Reese, Peter P.; Przytula, Kamila; Koval, Rachel; Ladner, Daniela P.; Levitsky, Josh M.; Abecassis, Michael M.; Wolf, Michael S. / Medication understanding, non-adherence, and clinical outcomes among adult kidney transplant recipients.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1294-1305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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