Melanoma detection by skin self-examination targeting at-risk women: A randomized controlled trial with telemedicine support for concerning moles

June K. Robinson*, Samer Wahood, Sophia Ly, Jessie Kirk, Jamie Yoon, James Sterritt, Elizabeth Gray, Mary Kwasny

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Secondary melanoma prevention remains crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality for the 200,000 people in the United States estimated to develop melanoma in 2021. This 3-month randomized controlled trial of online skin self-examination (SSE) education among 1000 at-risk women who received care at Northwestern Medicine in Illinois sought to determine SSE initiation and monthly performance, SSE anxiety and confidence, and health care practitioner (HCP) visits for concerning moles. Positive responses to a personal history of sunburn, a personal or family history of skin cancer, and/or having 10 or more lifetime indoor tanning sessions identified and informed women of their increased risk of melanoma. At one month, 96.2% of women receiving SSE education (SSE women) initiated SSE compared to 48.1% in the active control arm (control) (p < 0.001). More control women sought HCP visits (n = 107) than SSE women (n = 39). Control women seen by HCPs identified benign lesions, especially seborrheic keratosis, more often than SSE women. More atypical nevi (SSE 38.5%, control 8.4%) and melanomas (SSE 25.6%, control 4.7%) were visually identified by SSE women seeing HPCs (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in SSE anxiety between the control and SSE arms. Confidence increased significantly in the SSE arm whereas there was no change in the control group (p < 0.001). Women checked someone else for concerning moles [315/ 494 (63.8%) of SSE women]. Targeting at-risk women for SSE education may help reduce melanoma mortality, especially in rural communities where incidence and mortality are greater than in urban areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101532
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Melanoma
  • Online patient education
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Rural
  • Screening
  • Skin self-examination
  • Telemedicine
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics

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