Melting mechanisms of DNA-linked nanocomposite systems

Sung Yong Park*, George C Schatz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The origins of sharp melting transitions in DNA-linked nanocomposite systems are discussed. Under typical experimental conditions, the local salt concentration in DNA-linked nanocomposite systems is important, leading to salt-induced condensation both in DNA-linked gold nanoparticle systems and polymer-DNA hybrid systems that leads to cooperative melting. Although this coop-erativity is supported by the experimental results, which have measured the number of cooperative DNA sequences, and molecular dynamics simulations, some recent experiments suggest that the sharp melting does not arise entirely from salt condensation. We point out that this discrepancy can be resolved by considering the contribution of large clusters, which only exist below the melting transition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages206-213
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2nd Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience: Self-Assembled Architectures and Devices, FNANO 2005 - Snowbird, UT, United States
Duration: Apr 24 2005Apr 28 2005

Other

Other2nd Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience: Self-Assembled Architectures and Devices, FNANO 2005
CountryUnited States
CitySnowbird, UT
Period4/24/054/28/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Melting mechanisms of DNA-linked nanocomposite systems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Park, S. Y., & Schatz, G. C. (2005). Melting mechanisms of DNA-linked nanocomposite systems. 206-213. Paper presented at 2nd Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience: Self-Assembled Architectures and Devices, FNANO 2005, Snowbird, UT, United States.