Message framing, it does a body good: Effects of message framing and motivational orientation on young women's calcium consumption

Mary A. Gerend*, Melissa A. Shepherd

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the effects of gain-framed versus loss-framed messages and motivational orientation on calcium consumption. After completing a motivational orientation scale (behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system), undergraduate women (N = 141) were randomly assigned to read a gain-framed or loss-framed pamphlet promoting calcium consumption. Calcium consumption was assessed 1 month later. For calcium supplement behavior, a gain-framed advantage was observed for behavioral activation system-oriented individuals, whereas a loss-framed advantage was observed for behavioral inhibition system-oriented individuals. For dietary calcium intake, a gain-framed advantage was observed among behavioral activation system-oriented individuals; however, no framing effect emerged for behavioral inhibition system-oriented individuals. The success of framed messages depends on the message recipient's motivational orientation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1296-1306
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • Adolescent and young adult women
  • calcium consumption
  • message framing
  • motivational orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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