METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES and ADVANCES

Innovative Study Designs and Methods for Optimizing and Implementing Behavioral Interventions to Improve Health

Sylvie Naar*, Susan M. Czajkowski, Bonnie Spring

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Improving diet, activity level, and medication adherence and controlling tobacco and other substance use have all been shown to produce measurable, cost-effective improvements in health outcomes. However, many individuals do not respond to available treatments, and efficacious interventions are often not brought to scale. Developing and implementing more potent behavioral treatments in diverse populations to ultimately improve public health involves a focus on behavioral intervention research across the translational spectrum. There has been little attention paid to designs, methods, and analytic techniques for early phase trials. Method: The National Institutes of Health sponsored a cross-institute, 2-day Workshop on Innovative Study Designs and Methods for Developing, Testing and Implementing Behavioral Interventions to Improve Health to review, evaluate, and disseminate a selection of innovative designs and analytic strategies for use in behavioral intervention studies. Results: The workshop was organized to reflect methods appropriate for use across the translational spectrum. Because of the historical attention paid to the randomized clinical trial, the workshop placed particular emphasis on the designing and preliminary testing of behavioral interventions, the optimization of interventions, and the later effectiveness and implementation of trials. Conclusions: This article provides a summary of the methods discussed at the workshop, with recommendations for their use to improve the impact, reach, and costeffectiveness of behavioral intervention research across the translational spectrum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1081-1091
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume37
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Health
Behavioral Research
Education
Medication Adherence
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Tobacco
Randomized Controlled Trials
Public Health
Diet
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Health
  • Methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES and ADVANCES : Innovative Study Designs and Methods for Optimizing and Implementing Behavioral Interventions to Improve Health. / Naar, Sylvie; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Spring, Bonnie.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1081-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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